Belcher Gastronomique

A cheerily unalphabetical dictionary of food terms

Cathepsins

Cathepsins, abbreviated CTS, are a family of proteases (proteolytic enzymes) found in all mammals. Most of these enzymes are activated in the low pH found in lysosomes, (the organelles within cells which contain enzymes).

“At the lower temperature muscle proteins contract and squeeze out water far more slowly, which is crucial to keeping the meat moist. But it also needs to be tenderised, which at this temperature is done by enzymes, particularlycalpains and cathepsins that weaken or break down collagen and other proteins. Calpains stop working at 40°C/105°F, cathepsins at 50°C/120°F, but below these cut-off points, the higher the temperature, the faster they work. Heating the meat slowly means these enzymes can perform their magic for several hours before denaturing, effectively ageing the meat during cooking. The result is the tenderest, tastiest meat imaginable.”

– Heston Blumenthal, In Search of Perfection, p. 166

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January 6, 2010 Posted by | c, Ca, Cat | , , , | Leave a comment

Calpains

Calpains are a family of calcium-dependent, non-lysosomal cysteine proteases (proteolytic enzymes) that are expressed ubiquitously in mammols.

“At the lower temperature muscle proteins contract and squeeze out water far more slowly, which is crucial to keeping the meat moist. But it also needs to be tenderised, which at this temperature is done by enzymes, particularly calpains and cathepsins that weaken or break down collagen and other proteins. Calpains stop working at 40°C/105°F, cathepsins at 50°C/120°F, but below these cut-off points, the higher the temperature, the faster they work. Heating the meat slowly means these enzymes can perform their magic for several hours before denaturing, effectively ageing the meat during cooking. The result is the tenderest, tastiest meat imaginable.”

– Heston Blumenthal, In Search of Perfection, p. 166

January 6, 2010 Posted by | c, Ca, Cal | , , , | Leave a comment

Cyanocobalamin

Cyanocobalamin is another name for vitamin B12.

November 26, 2009 Posted by | Cy, Cya | , | Leave a comment

Natasha Campbell-McBride

Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride is a Russian-born neurologist and nutritionist and author of the book Gut and Psychology Syndrome. She lives in Cambridge in the UK where she runs a nutritional consultancy with a specialism in treating neurodevelopmental conditions such as ADHD, Asperger’s syndrome, dyslexia, dyspraxia etc. Dr Campbell-McBride trained and worked as a neurologist before giving birth to her son who began to display the symptoms of autism. Given the contact of the late Dr Bernard Rimland of the Autism Research Institute she began to treat her son following Dr Rimland’s influential nutritional protocol and found that, contrary to the conventional pessimistic medical views of her colleagues, her son recovered rapidly. After this experience, Dr Campbell-McBride assiduously pursued a course of study in nutrition, having observed that her son’s digestion had never been right. Having done this she came to see the links between gut dysbiosis and autism and became convinced it was a causal link. Since that discovery, Natasha Campbell-McBride has worked hard to raise awarness of the significance of her research and published an influential book, Gut and Psychology Syndrome which in many ways advances the research of her acknowledged teacher, Dr Rimland.

“I believe that autism begins in the digestive tract, and it begins with damage to the gut flora in these children.. In our modern world we’ve got an epidemic of abnormalities in the gut flora.. what I find is that every mother of an autistic child has got deeply abnormal gut flora.” – Natasha Campbell-McBride in video with Donna Gates

November 13, 2009 Posted by | c, Ca, Cam | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment